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Maybe it's time that we accept the facts.

22 posts in this topic

Posted

You with me though that motion control was a good idea when it came to aiming in the 3DS OoT and MM remakes?

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Posted

Yeah, I'd say that's optional and largely unobtrusive.

Skyward sword was not optional.

Basically options are good.

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Posted

Ill read this thread in a moment, but i literally JUX'D watched these and they are pretty relevant. The video about Zelda can easily be expanded to most of Nintendo's franchises.

 

Zelda and Nostalgia

 

Music and Mario

 

And for bonus--

Nintendo Controllers and why they so weird


Yeah, and I see that now obviously, lol. But I meant I used to think there was a lot more.

I think, in this perspective, what really made this series great in terms of lore and world building was it's wonder. So much was said but even more was left unsaid. Not everything needed to be told. Like, we don't need to know how Link's love hexagon or w/e worked out in OoT. It doesn't matter and probably would have detracted from the story and experience if too many details were included. Not to mention, the game is entirely from Link's perspective, and nearly every cut scene was Link learning something or participating in something. While i personally am not a fan of fanfiction (and all it encompasses) I really cant blame kids for taking the bait. It's when they grow up and use their actual artistic skills to maker fan art and fiction and musical remixes and such that i have a problem with. I mean, being inspired by and paying homage to is cool and natural, but i don't see the point in fanfiction for fanficiton's sake. With a few exceptions i suppose. Idk im rambling and being a bit judgmental now haha. Just some of my 2cents.

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Posted

Im gonna be 100% straight with you guys--

 

I love Nintendo because it was my distraction from life since ever. It's nostalgia hardcore. I don't think I like video games otherwise. It was also how my sister and I bonded when i was a child, and how i bond with her son, my nephew. Now, things have changed in my relationship with my sister (currently not on speaking terms) but i still cherish those memories. Nintendo inspired my creative side and encouraged my art exploration as a kid, and was a convenient reality exit when i needed it to be. Which was more often than I want to admit. If  think about my life in hard detail, I was most depressed during the Wii generation. As much as I love Nintendo, the Wii was shit lol. I had no outlet for my frustrations and so much was happening in my life in those years, i really could have used the distraction of some good Nintendo. Even though Wii U has awful sales and people actually ridicule me for playing it over ps4/xbox1 (people actually do this, and it's like, grow up? lol) i actually enjoy it as a console. the games are fun and the off tv play is actually perfect for my gaming style! I understand why people don't appreciate Nintendo, "triple A" games offer a lot of interesting features and stories. But i don't play video games for the story (i hate how other game companies use cut scenes tbh) i watch tv and movies and read comics for story. I just play Nintendo to FEEL GOOD. And Nintendo has done and currently is doing that for me! 

 

This is why I love Nintendo games. I don't see this as a bad thing either. If i didn't associate Nintendo with various emotions and feelings, i probably just wouldnt play video games.

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Posted

tl;dr  I was the problem; are you?

 

otherwise, come and read my largely unnecessary essay. The (modern) problem with The Legend of Zelda is a particular consumer demographic that we refer to in academic circles as fourteen-year-olds.

 

Say you have a fourteen-year-old who likes (modern) Zelda for what it is - pretty much, a game about gimmicks. Every level in every game has a gimmick and a gimmick item, and the fun is in seeing how you use the gimmick item to navigate the level's gimmick and eventually fight the Gimmick Boss. Weaved through this is fantasy-setting story to give it some atmosphere (and charm, the charm is probably the best part now). As it turns out, this is a good game when it plays to its strengths, and allows for some clever and enchanting moments.

 

Fourteen is a pivotal age because when you're fourteen, you're self-aware enough to know what you like, but not self-aware enough not to be obsessed with what you like. Well, a full-fledged Zelda game only comes out about 1.5 times every home console generation, so all the obsessed fourteen-year-olds aren't getting enough. Enter two different but related problems: The Twilight Princess Problem and The Timeline Problem (again, these labels are nothing new in academic circles).

 

The Twilight Princess Problem: Starved fourteen-year-olds demand that the next game be bigger, more sprawling, and more elaborate. The gimmicks are still there, and the charm, but now they're under a layer of "trying to be everything"ness. So now you have the same basic gimmick game, but where the good parts are farther between because there's a lot of bloat. It's hard to pick out the charm. This is what scares me when they describe the next console game as "the biggest yet" et al., and when people get excited about such a thing.

 

The Timeline Problem: Starved fourteen-year-olds, anticipating this next game, have to squeeze as much as they can out of the games they already have in the meantime. They can re-play them, but there's only so many times one can re-play The Gimmick Game. So they turn to the fantasy-setting story, and milk all they can out of it; the issue is, there's not much there to milk. Zelda lore wasn't terribly well-integrated or thought out (except on a game-by-game basis and the occasional reference) until recently, because of the fallacy of people projecting that onto it. (The lorey way to look at it is "well, it's the legend of zelda, so it's consistent with the oral tradition of legends that the stories wouldn't fit together exactly", but I don't care about that EITHER so don't try me).

 

When I dislike something about a (modern) zeldo, I can usually attribute it to one of these. It's unfortunate, because when we have either of these, there's a good gimmick game in there that just wasn't treated right. A Link Between Worlds is a fine modern example of a game that avoids The Twilight Princess Problem by appealing to its own charm rather than being a sprawling everygame, and it looks like Totem Time Dressboy Legends is shaping up to be another. The charm's my favorite, and I'm kinda more excited for Totem Kids than for Wii U Skyrim. Low-profile and spinoff games solve The Timeline Problem by being insignificant in the timeline, but other than that I feel like the Big Boy Games are locked into recognizing the timeline until they eventually disregard it.

 

This feels like a colossal write-up but the truth is a guy like me doesn't care much about any of it and honestly I want to gag myself for trying to pretend I can have serious opinions on a dumb thing. They caught me, I'm riding the zelda train to the station, and whether it's a good game or not I enjoy the h*ck out of myself when I'm playing it and feels ok to be 14 sometimes

Fierce Muffin, Cirt and Pizzza like this

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Posted

I'll read your post when I'm at my desktop. But it's funny that the most activity we've had in a while had been bashing the series

Pizzza likes this

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Posted

I absolutely love the, um, 'Landmark' games in the series. You know, OoT, MM. Windwaker I liked, but ehh. I would have to agree that with all of the spinoffs and such, the series just might be mediocre. However, it is still my favorite if only for Oot, MM, and TP. (Never beat the originals but I did enjoy them)

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