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Posted

I basically just want to copy Masaaki Yuasa's perspective play, and so in order to know how to manipulate it effectively, I feel like I should know all the rules for drawing it accurately as God In Heaven intended it to be seen. And then once you know the rules, you can then manipulate one of those rules, eg. position or curvature of the horizon line, and then go through the process, to see how the final product is effected by the change. Bit of experimentation.

 

I was just walking up the road a minute ago and decided that I'll give this a rest for now and just draw a normal perspective plane, but instead I'll work with doing roads going over hills.

 

But then again, though the vanishing point is 5km away, I would be able to see the tip of a hill that is 10km away, if the visibility was okay. So I'm not sure how I'll deal with measuring the height of that. I guess it happens past the horizon. The lines go to the vanishing point, and then bend over the horizon, and the hill rises up from after that bend. But then you have to imagine where that bend stretches off to, what the lines will look like, etc. I dunno.

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Posted

This has been my thing for today. The height and length axes are bent to towards two points, while the depth axis is just a straight line, since it more or less looks that way when I references a straight line reflecting against a glass ball. So I was going for a fish-eye-lens, glass ball effect. It worked out nice enough I think, for an experiment.

 

tumblr_n43bxcwTHz1qdek7mo1_500.jpg

 

tumblr_n43bxcwTHz1qdek7mo2_500.jpg

 

The depth lines should have gotten narrower more quickly as they went along, but I wasn't paying attention to that so much.

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Posted

It makes me think of looking through a drop of water (or some such)

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Posted

Good thought. Maybe I'll play around with continuing the perspective lines outside of the sphere as well, to see if I can put the wall, floor, and cuboid behind it, to get that kind of water drop effect as you said. Though then it'd also have to be inverted because physics? I dunno. I'll have to look at water droplets.

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Posted

More perspective fun, with chalk and floors.

 

tumblr_n4gi1mpnVd1qdek7mo1_1280.jpg

 

tumblr_n4gi1mpnVd1qdek7mo2_1280.jpg

 

tumblr_n4gi1mpnVd1qdek7mo3_1280.jpg

 

tumblr_n4gi1mpnVd1qdek7mo4_1280.jpg

 

Picture of floor for realistic perspective. Draw over the picture and then draw cubes onto the new perspective grid. Convert the grid to top-down 2D grid, assuming the cubes are drawn on the floor in the perspective grid, with lines intersecting tile grout lines etc. Draw 2D grid onto floor. Take picture from same spot as first picture. End.

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Posted

youre taking this so far so quickly.

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Posted

This was a puppying nightmare, but I have a sense of pride over it. This kind of satisfaction only comes from perspective grid drawing. There are flaws where god-know-what went wrong. I had to use a lot of math to figure some stuff out so problems might have arisen there. The problem solving was fun. I'm not sure what the vertical lines should be. This is different from the other messed-up water drop thing in that it gets smaller toward the centre rather than the edges. I'll think on it, when I'm not dead.

 

tumblr_n4nqtkQZna1qdek7mo1_1280.png

 

tumblr_n4nqtkQZna1qdek7mo2_1280.png

 

tumblr_n4nqtkQZna1qdek7mo3_1280.png

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Posted

Fascinating stuff! Ugh, it's always great to see someone with an affinity for perspective drawing. It's a really under appreciated art and skill, in my opinion.

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Posted

I thought I was done, but one more. This one has me trying out three things for the first time in perspective drawing: Proper attempt at 2 point perspective with objects; curved objects in perspective; and shadows in perspective. Shadows I'll have to look at more, but it didn't turn out too bad. The orange areas are the parts hit by sunlight. Figure all you need to do is add perspective lines with the source being the light source.


BmMAqrDIEAAG8nt.jpg


Noticed when I was life drawing earlier this week that I was finding it a bit less natural. I think maybe I've been spending so much time with a ruler that my freehand is probably suffering, so I'm going to try and do more life drawing to keep that in check a little. I probably wont post so much of that though, because I don't think it's as interesting to post about (I'm not as impressed with my life drawing as I am with my technical drawings).


I want to look at spirals though; the kind that get larger and larger. And eventually I'd like to change that above image into what I initially intended it to be: a staircase, or at least a slope.

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Posted

Been developing a presentable sketchbook for technical and perspective drawings lately.

 

First, the room one, and then a smaller version of the room one over two pages (second page also has a bunch of my loose sketches that I did at some point.

 

1ptrlha.jpg

cucetxy.jpg

 

Second, some writeup on some spiral experiments I was doing. For now I'm just working with shapes and lines in a 3D space, but once I actually start doing objects I'll go back to this one and actually draw a staircase so I can see about making it work. As it is now it's difficult to tell how it's turned out without it being a physical structure.

 

XWT8cdJ.jpg

 

Lastly, some elipses in perspective. On the far right is a big tube-like thing, and then the rest of it is just different circles for the sake of trying it out some more.

 

RzECFKf.jpg

 

And then here's some life drawing stuff from today. I did more full body stuff but I was these were the ones where I focused on specific areas, ie. face and hands. They turned out alright, the hands moreso because I spent more time on that one than the face one.

 

TqzLXbj.jpg

udHVwPt.jpg

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Posted

YES YEEEESSSSSSS KEEP GOING THIS IS REALLY COOL AND GOOD

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Posted

ok tyvm

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Posted

pro tip on rising spiral structures like staircases and fancy pillars: their front profile makes a sine wave. I discovered this while messing with parametric functions and graphical programming.

 

You might know this by now but if you don't it might be useful. As for "spirals that get bigger and bigger"-- are you referring to Fibonacci spirals?

 

Great stuff Teto, I'm glad you've found something you enjoy making.

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Posted

Yeah, in my first investigations I ended up with a sin/cos wave for the side-on view but totally forgot to put it in there (just drawing it, I decided that it was the one way it would logically be, with foreshortening, and then I realised it was basically a sin/cos wave, depending on where you're looking at it from). And there's not a huge lot of space for it now either. I might squeeze it in the left bottom corner. I can't remember if I explained it in the post, but the 4x4 square is what I imagined the circle would be like if you unraveled it and then elongated it vertically to make it a straight upwards slope. More or less like that. Did that for the sake of finding the crossover points without worrying about actually putting it in as a spiral.

 

And yeah, Fibonacci spirals. I did a page on that and some golden ratio stuff, but it wasn't pretty enough to warrant posting. It was just 2 Fibonacci spirals based on 1. The Golden ratio, dividing the length of the side of the first square by the golden ratio, and then making that the length of the next square (which ended up with the squares overlapping and stuff, and 2. Based on the Fibonacci sequence; 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, etc, making the squares 8cm^2, 5cm^2, 3cm^2, 2cm^2, 1cm^2, and 1cm^2,

 

RzECFKf.jpg

 

For this last one with all the ellipses, I drew the grid based on the Fibonacci sequence and 3:5 golden ratio idea. In the bottom left you can see a little thumbnail of the dimensions. Length is 21cm, height is 13cm, horizon occurs 8cm from the bottom and 5cm from the top, so that the horizon line is approximately a 3:5 split of the 3:5 height:length area.

 

Interestingly I found that the grid squares followed the same pattern as well. Coloured in blue, you can see that the width of the first grid square was 1.5cm, and the (measured) height was approx 0.95cm (more like 0.925 but I rounded up a little). When I checked to see what the ratio was, I decided to see that, if 1.5 was in the fibionacci sequence or something, what would be the next one down in the sequence. So I divided 1.5 by 1.618 (golden ratio) and it came out with 0.927, which was approximately what I measured the height to be.

 

So there's another pattern there. The height is more or less defined by where the horizontal line I drew (from middle bottom point to far right top corner where it hits the horizon line and boundary of view line) crosses the grid line. And then you draw a horizontal line across from that to find how quickly the grids move away from you. But yeah, it's probably a case of the fact that, since the grid was made using a lot of golden ratio ideas, it fell into the same pattern. I imagine that if I made the grid based on a 2:5 ratio for example, the grid squares would show a similar ratio in their height/bottom width lengths.

 

If you follow.

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Posted

A thread fill of circles and spirals is the last thing teto left behind before disappearing mysteriously one day. Inspection of his room by his parents following the disappearance revealed the walls, ceiling and the floor covered in spirals and circles.

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